‘Horror, fear, despair’: Venezuela’s oil capital shattered by ‘tsunami’ of violent looting

In the second city of Maracaibo, the crippling blackout sparked a terrifying rampage that police seemed unable to control Some liken the damage wrought on Venezuelas second city to a natural disaster. Others suspect satanic intervention. El demonio, says Betty Mndez, a local shopkeeper, by way of explanation for the wave of looting and unrest that convulsed Maracaibo earlier this month. Most, however, describe the mayhem in psychiatric terms: a collective breakdown that shocked this lakeside city to its core and offered a terrifying glimpse of Venezuelas possible future as it sinks deeper into economic, political and social decline. Horror, fear, despair, said Mara Villalobos, a 35-year-old journalist, weeping as she relived three days of violence that many here call …

Venezuela: opposition leader promises final push against Maduro amid new blackout

Announcement comes as Juan Guaids wife met with Donald Trump and Vice-President Mike Pence in Washington The opposition figurehead battling to topple Nicols Maduro has told supporters to prepare for a final nationwide push against Venezuelas authoritarian leader after the country suffered its Juan Guaid said it was time for Venezuelans of all social classes to increase pressure through what he called Operacin Libertad (Operation Freedom) a mobilization across the country that would culminate in a massive march through the capital. Although he did not say when the march would take place, Operation Freedom means [exerting] maximum popular political pressure of the kind never before seen in Venezuela, said Guaid, who most western governments now recognize as Venezuelas legitimate interim …

How Zello Became a Lifeline for Venezuelans Under Maduro

Even when María sleeps, she hears the voices. One at a time, they speak of chaos, hunger, confusion. As she dreams, she hears a familiar voice explain where you can still find certain medicines. This is the latest news from the US, says another. Run, run south right now, someone warns as calmly as they can. As María makes lunch for her kids and drops them off at their school in Miami, the voices are in her ear. As she falls asleep next to her husband at night, they’re there. The voices are those of Venezuelans, as well as of those among the Venezuelan diaspora, who for years have been engulfed by political and economic crisis under the country’s authoritarian …