Squaring up: how Insta-fashion is changing the way we shop

Instagram has become the window display for a new generation of savvy shoppers and its changing the way we consume style, for good and bad. Leah Harper meets some of the pioneers at the forefront of Insta-fashion Weve all bought them at some time or another: the perfect pair of shoes. Stylish, comfortable the kind you wear with everything until they fall apart, and you have to start scouring the internet for a replacement. But recently you might have noticed that the way you find a replacement has changed. Not long after you begin your search, a pair of similar shoes appears, as a sponsored post, on your Instagram feed. Theyre there one day, and then the next. Youll likely …

Hundreds of millions of Facebook records exposed on public servers report

Material discovered on Amazon cloud servers in latest example of Facebook letting third parties extract user data More than 540m Facebook records were left exposed on public internet servers, cybersecurity researchers said on Wednesday, in just the latest security black eye for the company. Researchers for the firm UpGuard discovered two separate sets of Facebook user data on public Amazon cloud servers, the company detailed in a Bloomberg, which first reported the leak, contacted Facebook. The smaller dataset was taken offline during UpGuards investigation. The data exposure is not the result of a breach of Facebooks systems. Rather, it is another example, akin to the privacy-focused platform are hampered by its own past practices and what UpGuard researchers called the …

Mark Zuckerbergs Facebook mission statement hides his real aim | Emily Bell

Social media founders proclaim their idealism, like modern day messiahs. Yet all they want is global market domination It is hard to remember that there was a blissful time, not so long ago, when company chief executives were anonymous creatures who rarely communicated with the outside world and, when they did, it was through the unengaging medium of a corporate press release. As with many other perfectly good practices, such as working an eight-hour day and going outside for lunch, Silicon Valley has put an end to this. Company statements are often personal homilies and meditations on themselves, their businesses and the world they are imperceptibly improving. Every public statement must contain an epiphany; every earnings announcement, a TED talk. …

A Beginner’s Guide to TikTok

It’s been more than three years since the lip-syncing app Musical.ly, now known as TikTok, first became popular among tweens and teens. The social network has since spread far beyond Generation Z: TikTok has been downloaded over 1 billion times, including 96 million in the United States, according to estimates from the research firm Sensor Tower. It’s also owned by the Chinese company Bytedance, now considered one of the most valuable startups in the world. The app itself revolves around sharing 15-second videoclips, which are set to music often licensed from artists and record labels. TikTok is now beloved not only by lip-syncing 14-year-olds, but also by comedians, athletes, and, yes, brands. Major corporations like Coca-Cola, Nike, ABC, and Google …

Russia passes law to jail people for 15 days for ‘disrespecting’ government

Law allowing courts to fine or jail offenders is reminiscent of Soviet-era laws used to target dissidents, say critics Russias parliament has approved a controversial law that allows courts to jail people for online disrespect of government or state officials, including the president, Vladimir Putin. The law, which critics say is reminiscent of Soviet-era legislation used to target political dissidents, stipulates fines of up to 100,000 roubles (1,155) for indecent online posts that demonstrate a blatant disrespect for society, the country, Russias official state symbols, the constitution, or the authorities. Repeat offenders can be hit with fines of up to twice this sum, or 15 days behind bars. Alexander Verkhovsky, the head of the Moscow-based Sova Centre, which monitors abuse …

Facebook criticised after women complain of inaction over abuse

Amnesty says social media firm must do more to support users who report harassment Human rights campaigners have called for action after a survey revealed that more than half of the reports that women lodge about harassment on Facebook are met with no action from the social media company. The Survation poll, commissioned by the feminist campaign group Level Up, found that 29% of the 1,000 women who took part had been harassed on Facebook. A spokesperson for Amnesty International UK said the extremely worrying findings were indicative of a new frontier of human rights abuses which are often unaddressed: Time and time again we hear social media companies making pledges that they will do better, but their efforts have …

‘Time for the Chinese miracle’: Beijing’s new English language propaganda push

Campaign including confusing rap song and stilted video explainer coincides with the annual Two Sessions political conference Chinese state media Two Sessions, which began this week. Among the more intelligible lines is this: Monkey King to the West, legendary dragon to the sky, yall know its time for Chinese miracle. It goes on: Weve got Two Sessions, weve got Two Sessions for the fragrance were blessing, to the world we show our affection. Play Video 4:32 a Xinhua video, two women uncomfortably answer questions as they are quizzed on fun facts about the Two Sessions. In another video by Xinhua titled, Chinese democracy in the eyes of an American, a reporter for Xinhua says: It is widely acknowledged that a …

How to Not Fall for Viral Scares

Who knows what the kids are doing online, right? They’ve got their TikToks and their Snapchats and their flop Instagram accounts, while parents are still posting on Facebook and Twitter. The disconnect between how the olds and their children use the internet leads to parental anxiety, and in the case of this week’s resurfacing of the viral fake Momo challenge, panic and misinformation. The Momo challenge, according to breathless news reports and posts from worried parents and law enforcement, is a game circulating on social media that encourages kids to engage in increasingly harmful behavior until, eventually, they’re supposed to commit suicide and upload the video to the internet. Momo is basically every parent’s nightmare. But as multiple outlets have …