Facebook to use AI to stop telling users to say hi to dead friends

Algorithmic features have sent suggestions to wish happy birthday to those whove died Facebook has promised to use artificial intelligence to stop suggesting users invite their dead friends to parties. The sites freshly emotionally intelligent AI is part of a rash of changes to how Facebook handles memorialised accounts pages whose owner has been reported deceased, but that are kept on the social network in their memory. Memorialisation of accounts allows for treasured images, videos and posts to be kept online, as well as providing a focal point for grieving friends and relatives to share memories. But the feature has caused its fair share of pain: since the account is kept on the social network and treated similarly to any …

Squaring up: how Insta-fashion is changing the way we shop

Instagram has become the window display for a new generation of savvy shoppers and its changing the way we consume style, for good and bad. Leah Harper meets some of the pioneers at the forefront of Insta-fashion Weve all bought them at some time or another: the perfect pair of shoes. Stylish, comfortable the kind you wear with everything until they fall apart, and you have to start scouring the internet for a replacement. But recently you might have noticed that the way you find a replacement has changed. Not long after you begin your search, a pair of similar shoes appears, as a sponsored post, on your Instagram feed. Theyre there one day, and then the next. Youll likely …

Mark Zuckerbergs Facebook mission statement hides his real aim | Emily Bell

Social media founders proclaim their idealism, like modern day messiahs. Yet all they want is global market domination It is hard to remember that there was a blissful time, not so long ago, when company chief executives were anonymous creatures who rarely communicated with the outside world and, when they did, it was through the unengaging medium of a corporate press release. As with many other perfectly good practices, such as working an eight-hour day and going outside for lunch, Silicon Valley has put an end to this. Company statements are often personal homilies and meditations on themselves, their businesses and the world they are imperceptibly improving. Every public statement must contain an epiphany; every earnings announcement, a TED talk. …

Is it ever too late to reply to an email? | Oliver Burkeman

Social expectations about digital etiquette have never been more in flux. The solution? Avoid worrying about it altogether You know youve reached a crisis point in your email backlog when youre obliged as I was recently to confront the following conundrum of electronic etiquette: is it ruder to reply to an email after three months than not to reply at all? On one hand, obviously, given since 1969. Three months is, lets be clear, far too long to delay a reply. But I suspect were entering a phase in emails history when social expectations about such matters have never been more in flux. As the burden of digital communication keeps increasing, digital minimalism is entering the mainstream. (I recommend a …

Russia passes law to jail people for 15 days for ‘disrespecting’ government

Law allowing courts to fine or jail offenders is reminiscent of Soviet-era laws used to target dissidents, say critics Russias parliament has approved a controversial law that allows courts to jail people for online disrespect of government or state officials, including the president, Vladimir Putin. The law, which critics say is reminiscent of Soviet-era legislation used to target political dissidents, stipulates fines of up to 100,000 roubles (1,155) for indecent online posts that demonstrate a blatant disrespect for society, the country, Russias official state symbols, the constitution, or the authorities. Repeat offenders can be hit with fines of up to twice this sum, or 15 days behind bars. Alexander Verkhovsky, the head of the Moscow-based Sova Centre, which monitors abuse …

Facebook criticised after women complain of inaction over abuse

Amnesty says social media firm must do more to support users who report harassment Human rights campaigners have called for action after a survey revealed that more than half of the reports that women lodge about harassment on Facebook are met with no action from the social media company. The Survation poll, commissioned by the feminist campaign group Level Up, found that 29% of the 1,000 women who took part had been harassed on Facebook. A spokesperson for Amnesty International UK said the extremely worrying findings were indicative of a new frontier of human rights abuses which are often unaddressed: Time and time again we hear social media companies making pledges that they will do better, but their efforts have …