Please read this before you post another RIP on social media.

Grieving in the technology age is uncharted territory.

Ill take you back to Saturday, June 9, 2012. At 8:20 a.m., my 36-year-old husband was pronounced dead at a hospital just outside Washington, D.C.

By 9:20 a.m., my cellphone would not stop ringing or text-alerting me long enough for me to make the necessary calls that I needed to make: people like immediate family, primary-care doctors to discuss death certificates and autopsies, funeral homes to discuss picking him up, and so on. Real things, important things, time-sensitive, urgent things.

  • a system or organization in which people or groups are ranked one above the other according to status or authority, and
  • an arrangement or classification of things according to relative importance or inclusiveness.
  • What does this mean as it relates to grief? Let me explain. When someone dies whether suddenly or after a prolonged illness, via natural causes or an unnatural fate, a young person in their prime or an elderly person with more memories behind them than ahead there is one universal truth: The ripples of people who are affected is vast and, at times, largely unknown to all other parties.

    A death is always a gut punch with varying degrees of force and a reminder of our own mortality. Most people are moved to express their love for the deceased by showing their support to the family and friends left behind.

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    Tags: Real Life

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